Program on Science, Technology and Society at Harvard

Harvard Kennedy School of Government | Harvard University

Current Fellows

The Program on Science, Technology and Society at Harvard sponsors a small number of stipendary and non-stipendary fellowships each year at the Kennedy School of Government who conduct research and receive advanced training in Science and Technology Studies. For more information on the Fellows Program, click here. For information on past fellows, see the links on the left. Below are a list of the current fellows with the program and a brief description of their backgrounds and interests, with links to more detailed pages containing more detailed information.

Ingrid Foss Ballo

Ingrid Foss Ballo is a Visiting Research Fellow with the Program on Science, Technology & Society (STS) at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and a PhD candidate in Environmental Geography at the University of Bergen. Her current research focuses on public reasoning and sociotechnical imaginaries of new and emerging energy technologies, and the coproduction of “smart grid” technology and the “smart” energy society. During her time at Harvard she will study interactions between imaginaries of “smart” energy futures at different scales. She will also participate in a European research project on smart meters and social acceptability and in an international research group working on Smart Grids & Smart Cities.

Jeremy Baskin

Jeremy Baskin is a Visiting Research Fellow with the Program on Science, Technology & Society (STS) at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government.  For the past five years he has been working at the intersection of STS and environmental politics exploring the sociotechnical imaginaries of solar geoengineering.  He is particularly interested in the ways in which notions of the Anthropocene and of post-nature are mobilised in relation to emergent technologies.  Other research interests include environmental politics in the global South and their relationship to the development project.  Whilst at Harvard he plans to commence work on the contested politics of energy and development in contemporary South Africa.

Thomas Bertorelli

Thomas Bertorelli is a Visiting Research Fellow at the Program on Science, Technology & Society (STS) at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and a PhD student in Sociology at Brandeis University. Thomas’ developing research interests focus on the globalization of the clinical trials industry. He is designing a research project in order to better understand how connections between political, economic, and pharmaceutical interests shape the development and practice of transnational health research. 

Margarita Boenig-Liptsin

Margarita (Margo) Boenig-Liptsin is a Research Associate at the Program on Science, Technology & Society (STS). She continuing the work she began as a Postdoctoral Fellow (2015-2016) with Sheila Jasanoff on a National Science Foundation funded project, "Traveling Imaginaries of Innovation: The Practice Turn and Its Transnational Implementation."  The project examines how three models of innovation have become go-to answers for socioeconomic challenges confronting 21st century nations.

Francesca Bosisio

Francesca Bosisio works at the Lausanne University Hospital (Switzerland) and is an associate researcher at the Health Psychology Research Centre and at the Interface Science-Society of the University of Lausanne. She studied health psychology and sociology of sciences and received an in-depth training in research methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative. Francesca is currently a Visiting Research Fellow in the Program on Science, Technology and Society at Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Her studies focus on the broad consent to genomic medicine and the public’s perceptions. 

Tito Carvalho

Tito Carvalho is a Ph.D. candidate in sociology and science studies at the University of California, San Diego. Born and raised in Brazil, he has a Bachelor and a Master of Science degree in biology from Arizona State University. As a Visiting Research Fellow with the  Program on Science, Technology & Society, Tito will work on interpreting how interrelated ideas about tropical nature and society grounded new sociotechnical imaginaries in the middle of the twentieth century that valorized diversity in the face of oppression and predicted increased harmony between human beings and the conditions of their existence.

Michael Aaron Dennis

Michael Aaron Dennis is Professor of Strategy and Policy at the Naval War College and a Research Associate with the Program on Science, Technology and Society. His current work focuses on the integration of science and technology into US grand strategy. During his time at Harvard, he will also be contributing to the National Science Foundation project, “Traveling Imaginaries: A Comparative Study of Three Models of Innovation in Their Transnational Implementation.” 

Samuel Weiss Evans

Sam Weiss Evans is a Visiting Research Fellow with the Program for Science, Technology, and Society at the Harvard Kennedy School and a Research Affiliate at the Program on Emerging Technologies at MIT. Sam will be spending the year writing his book on the construction and governance of security concerns in emerging technology, and continuing engagement work with the synthetic biology community, particularly in relation to work being done on gene drive systems and proposals for their development and use.

Laura Frye-Levine

Laura Frye-Levine is a dual PhD candidate in Sociology and Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison and a Visiting Research Fellow with the Program on Science, Technology and Society. She has training in earth science, environmental science and policy, sociology, and STS. Laura’s research examines interdisciplinary approaches to environmental sustainability and the quest for value plurality in environmental policy. Her doctoral research is an ethnography of collaboration and knowledge production in an emerging human-environment interdiscipline. 

Joakim Juhl

Joakim Juhl is an assistant professor at Aalborg University in Copenhagen, Denmark and a Research Associate with the Program on Science, Technology and Society. His research focuses on the normative foundations of technological innovation and its relation to social expectations of science. Joakim contributes to the National Science Foundation funded project, “Traveling Imaginaries of Innovation: The Practice Turn and Its Transnational Implementation”. The project examines the ways in which innovation models are identified and reproduced in different regional settings. As part of his work for the project, Joakim investigates Copenhagen-Malmö and Cambridge, UK.

Christopher Lawrence

Chris Lawrence is a Visiting Research Fellow with the Program on Science, Technology and Society in Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He is generally interested in questions of knowledge as they pertain to arms control and disarmament. While at Harvard, he will examine the making of open-source nuclear intelligence, and the role it plays in the framing of public narratives about weapons of mass destruction.

Moran Levy

Moran Levy is a Visiting Research Fellow with the Program on Science, Technology and Society at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and a PhD Candidate in the Sociology Department at Columbia University. Her current research examines how the emergence of cancer as a leading cause of death in the U.S. has transformed the institutions of medical research and care. Her work traces how the failure to cure cancer and the need to detect elusive and marginal effects of highly toxic chemotherapeutics led researchers to mesh together medicine and statistics and to construct new infrastructure for producing medical evidence. In particular, her work examines the emergence of large-scale randomized clinical trials. While at Harvard, Moran is focusing on the relation between the standardization of cancer trials and oncological diagnostic classifications.

Nicolas Miailhe

Nicolas Miailhe is a Senior Visiting Research Fellow with the Program on Science, Technology and Society (STS) at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. His work centers on the governance of, and through, emerging technosciences. Nicolas also specialize in urban innovation and civic technologies. He has ten years of professional experience in emerging markets such as India, working at the nexus of innovation, high technology, government, industry and civil society.

Zara Mirmalek

Zara Mirmalek is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the Program on Science, Technology and Society at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. Her research focuses on cultural and historical studies of technology, science, and human-machine workgroups situated within contemporary organizational communities, in particular those that operate as public references for societal norms of science, exploration and technology innovation. Her interests include organization environments and lived-experiences of work-time relationships, culture and communication, and sociotechnical imaginaries of democracy, citizen identity, and public participation.

Jacob D. Moses

Jacob D. Moses is a Research Fellow with the Harvard STS Program and  a Ph.D. candidate in the History of Science at Harvard University, where he specializes in issues of ethics, society, and governance concerning biomedicine and emerging biotechnologies, and is affiliated with the Science, Religion, and Culture Program at Harvard Divinity School. He is currently developing a comparative research project examining cultures of moral and affective responsibility within post-WWII biomedical practices and institutions.

Ehsan Nabavi

Ehsan Nabavi is a Visiting Research Fellow with the Program on Science, Technology and Society (STS) at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. His research focuses on understanding water conflict formation, evolution, and transformation against the backdrop of Anthropocene, particularly in the Middle East and the Central Asia.

Kellie Owens

Kellie Owens is a Visiting Research Fellow with the Program on Science, Technology, and Society (STS) at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and a PhD Candidate in Sociology and Science in Human Culture at Northwestern University. Her current research examines changing risk management philosophies and practices in medicine, with a focus on American obstetrics. While at Harvard, Kellie is working on a related article on the boundaries of responsible knowledge in medicine. The article uses the case of electronic fetal heart rate monitoring during labor and delivery to explore how medical providers are reacting to data suggesting that monitoring technology is not improving health outcomes and may be leading to unnecessary interventions.

Helge Peters

Helge Peters is a Visiting Research Fellow with the Program on Science, Technology & Society and a DPhil Candidate in Geography and the Environment at the University of Oxford. His research explores relations between knowledge, power, and materiality in the design and use of computational decision-support tools for environmental governance with a specific focus on fisheries management.

Kyoko Sato

Kyoko Sato is Associate Director of the Program in Science, Technology, and Society at Stanford University and Senior Researcher on the Harvard STS Program's project, “The Fukushima Disaster and the Cultural Politics of Nuclear Power in the United States and Japan(2013-2016). The project is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation, with Sheila Jasanoff as the Principal Investigator, and explores how postwar nuclear governance evolved in Japan and the United States, as well as the impact of the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster.

Kasper Hedegaard Schiølin

Kasper Hedegaard Schiølin is a Visiting Postdoctoral Fellow with the Program on Science, Technology & Society (STS) at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government funded by The Carlsberg Foundation. While at Harvard, Kasper will lay the foundation for a fresh project about perfection and technology. His hypothesis is that new technologies are accompanied by socio-technical imaginaries of human perfection, both at a societal and at an existential level. To substantiate this, the project will study the so-called “Fourth Industrial Revolution”, a notion recently coined by the World Economic Forum at their 2016 annual meeting in Davos, as an epochal designation of the present.

Amit Sheniak

Amit Sheniak is a Post Doctoral Fellow at the Swiss Center for Conflict Research at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and a Visiting Research Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Program on Science, Technology and Society (STS). His current research focus on the interaction between states and Cyberspace, and the effect of Information Communication Technologies (ICT) on the international and the internal state based order. While at Harvard, he will explore the current securitization stage of the Internet by collecting and recording evidence of soft power employed by states toward the local and the international public.

Hilton Simmet

Hilton Simmet is a Research Assistant at the STS Program at Harvard. In this role, he will provide research assistance to the National Science Foundation project "Traveling Imaginaries: A Comparative Study of Three Models of Innovation in Transnational Implementation" and on the Who Knows? project funded by a grant from the Bassetti Foundation. He will also serve as a Teaching Fellow for ESPP 78: Environmental Politics. He just returned from Senegal, where he spent the 2015-2016 academic year as Fulbright Scholar looking at how varied imaginaries of development compete for time and value, and how local modes of world-making intersect with global concerns about sustainable development, migration, and progress.

Maayan Sudai

Maayan Sudai is Visiting Research Fellow with the Harvard STS Program, an SJD candidate at Harvard Law School, and a Student Fellow in Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School. Maayan’s current research examines the interaction between law, science and society, mainly through a critical lens and combining multiple disciplines, such as history of medicine, law and social change, health law and bioethics, and Science Technology and Society (STS) studies. After serving as a leading advocate for the intersex rights’ movement in Israel, Maayan’s dissertation explores the legal struggles of patient advocacy movements against medical institutions in the US.

Gili Vidan

Gili Vidan is a Fellow at the Harvard STS Program and a PhD student at the Harvard History of Science Department. Her work addresses the formation of the human subject and the emergence of new sovereignties in the digital environment through issues such as online identity and authentication, cryptocurrencies, and transatlantic cybersecurity regimes. This year she will continue to explore various aspects of digital constitutionalism emerging from an STS Fellows working group which met regularly last year.